Gender Equity Network

« Hors du Hezb, point de salut ». Militer au féminin au sein du Hezbollah libanais.

Chaque jeudi, après la prière du soir, des femmes seules ou en petits groupes défilent dans les rues de Ghobeyri, municipalité de la banlieue sud de Beyrouth (Dahiyeh). Elles se dirigent vers le cimetière Rawdât al-shahîdayn[1] (le jardin de deux martyrs) pour se recueillir sur les tombeaux de leurs proches.

Tatimma Issue 1

 

 


This issue of Tatimma focuses on the question of civil rights and liberties in Lebanon. Whilst it is usually considered that civil freedoms in Lebanon are light-years ahead of other Arab countries. Yet this state of liberties appears to be more a facade for a discriminatory system which limits the liberties of Lebanese citizens, specifically Lebanese women, refugees, foreign workers to name a few.

English

Civil Society Review issue 2 - Lebanese, refugee, and migrant women in Lebanon: From sociopolitical marginality to turnaround strategies

While women’s issues and rights have been at the forefront of public and civil society debate, academic, and activist publications, women’s inequalities and the discrimination women face in Lebanon have been notably undermined, whether as citizens, refugees, or migrants. However, if the publicising of the “issue of women in Lebanon” has prompted the production of more “gender-related” information and knowledge, it has oftentimes adopted the rhetoric of denunciation and victimisation.

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