Gender Equity Network

Unequal and Unprotected: Women's Rights Under Lebanese Personal Status Law

Lebanon does not have a civil code regulating personal status matters. Instead, there are 15 separate personal status laws for the country’s different recognized religious communities including twelve Christian, four Muslim, the Druze, and Jewish confessions, which are administered by separate religious courts. Religious authorities often promoted this judicial pluralism as being essential to protecting Lebanon’s religious diversity.

A Practical Guide for Civil Society Organisations in Lebanon towards Gender Mainstreaming (En-Ar)

This Gender Manual is a practical guide for civil society organisations in Lebanon that wish to enhance gender equity in their practices and policies. Far from being exhaustive, this manual contains practical guidelines that can help to both gain a better understanding of gender-sensitive topics, as well as to integrate and implement them in internal processes, action plans, and organisational structures and policies. It is informed by the findings of a series of meetings and consultations with various stakeholders engaged in gender issues.

On Mixed Identities, Racism, and Activism in Lebanon; A Discussion with Nisreen Kaj.

In a recent article published in the New Yorker, which was quite popular online, mixed marriages between citizens of two different countries are described as playing a part in developing compassion and understanding between people in the world: “The awareness and negotiation of small differences add up to a larger understanding about the complexities of the world.”[1] Amidst growing globalisation, mixed marriages are indeed increasingly common and appreciated for their transnational multiculturalism.

Patriarchy and Sectarianism: A Gendered Trap. Baseline of Women in Politics: The Case of Lebanon.

Today, women in Lebanon are fighting for equal access to opportunities and rights without prejudice against their gender, their expectations and their careers. This fight requires attention for and analysis of the deep-rooted patriarchal structures that by their very nature exclude women. When Lebanese women decide to become politically active, they are faced with many challenges, from society’s expectations of them to gender stereotyping, and often limited access to the necessary resources to build a political career.



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