Gender Equity Network

School-Related Gender Based Violence (SRGBV) in Lebanon

It is well known that the cultural norms and the patriarchal society in Lebanon contribute to encouraging discrimination and any form of violence against women and children. More specifically, GBV in schools (SRGBV) and universities (URGBV) go unchecked in the face of indifference from the institutions’ administrations, community and the Ministries within the country.

Gendering State–Citizen Relations in Lebanon: The Case of the Family Violence Bill 2014

This report examines the nature of interaction and engagement between Lebanese citizens’ collectives and the state on gender-specific matters, through the case study of the Family Violence Bill that was passed in 2014. It analyses the practical ways in which civil society organised and engaged with the state to lobby for the Family Violence Bill prior to its passing.

Attitudes towards Domestic Violence in Lebanon: A Qualitative Study of Primary Care Practitioners

In most Arab countries, family matters including Domestic Violence continue to be handled by religious courts as civil legislation does not criminalise acts of violence within the family. In Lebanon, a law to this effect has been debated within a parliamentary committee since 2010. It is strongly opposed as it conflicts with much current legislation based on tradition. For example, article 503 defines rape as a forcible sexual act committed against someone other than a spouse.

Examining Sexual Harassment Draft Laws in Lebanon: Women's Equal Right to Public Space

In light of recent proposals for legislation againsts sexual harassment (SH) in Lebanon, this policy brief explores the subject of SH in public, institutional and workplace settings. The paper dissects the two draft laws presented by MP Ghassan Moukheiber and Minister of State for Women's Affairs, Jean Ogasapian, and provides policy suggestions and recommendations.

The State of Gender Justice in the Arab Region

This study maps the current state of gender justice in the Arab region, documenting barriers as well as opportunities. Its primary research aim is to determine how to develop an environment, at the legal, policy, and social levels that is conducive to gender justice. The study also provides insight on the state of gender justice through a legal perspective, in addition to de facto perspective. This is accomplished through a review of significant legislative, political, and social changes that have arisen from 2004 to 2016.

Unequal and Unprotected: Women's Rights Under Lebanese Personal Status Law

Lebanon does not have a civil code regulating personal status matters. Instead, there are 15 separate personal status laws for the country’s different recognized religious communities including twelve Christian, four Muslim, the Druze, and Jewish confessions, which are administered by separate religious courts. Religious authorities often promoted this judicial pluralism as being essential to protecting Lebanon’s religious diversity.

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