Refugees

Survey of refugees and humanitarian staff in Lebanon

This report is based on answers to two surveys carried out in Lebanon in 2018 as part of a project to understand how refugees and humanitarian staff perceive the impact of the reforms enshrined in the Grand Bargain. The first survey was conducted face-to-face with 895 Syrian and Palestinian refugees across all eight governorates of Lebanon. The second included 290 staff members of national and international aid agencies, with data collected using an online survey tool.

Legal and Policy Framework of Migration Governance

This report aims to provide a contextual understanding of migration governance in the Lebanese context, as well as its implications for refugees and migrants. Towards this end, this report provides an overview of the legal and policy framework in Lebanon, notably within the context of the Syrian refugee crisis erupting in 2011. Moreover, the report critically evaluates the legal statuses – if any – pertaining to ‘asylum seekers’, ‘refugees’, and ‘migrants’ on the one hand, and the role of state and non-state actors on the other.

Study for a Viable Framework for Livelihood and Social Enterprise Projects in Bar Elias in the Bekaa

This report presents the findings of the labour market study in Bar Elias and the Bekaa, focusing on the labour activities, initiatives, and aspirations of current B&Z beneficiaries and Syrian refugee youth and women heads of household respondents that could potentially be engaged through future interventions. It also presents a general overview of the formal employment sectors that Syrians can engage in, by law, as well as principles and approaches that could be adopted for the informal economic activities that Syrian refugees engage in.

Field Diagnosis: Prostitution and Trafficking in Women in the Eastern Suburbs of Beirut

Lebanon provides a refuge for many women and teenagers driven away from neighbouring countries by wars and conflicts, as well as some who have come from other countries seeking better economic conditions. Trafficking and prostitution are exacerbated in a context of unemployment and insecurity, where the State is often absent.

The Legal Status of Syrian Refugees in Lebanon

In October 2014, Lebanon’s Council of Ministers adopted a comprehensive policy on Syrian displacement, one explicit goal of which is to decrease the number of Syrians in Lebanon by reducing access to territory and encouraging return to Syria. This ambition is currently being implemented through the December 2014 General Security Office (GSO) new set of entry requirements for Syrians and new rules for Syrian nationals already in Lebanon applying for and renewing their residency permits.

Trapped in Lebanon: The Alarming Human Rights and Human Security Situation of Syrian Refugees in Lebanon

This report analyses the human rights and human security situation of refugees from Syria and their impact on the Lebanese society. Since the beginning of the conflict
in Syria, Lebanon has received ever-increasing numbers of Syrian citizens and Palestinian refugees living in Syria who were seeking refuge. With almost one and a half million refugees out of a population of four million, Lebanon has the highest proportion of refugees world-wide, and one of the highest in absolute numbers. The country has received more refugees from Syria than the entire European Union.

The Situation of Palestinian Refugees in Lebanon

This document provides information about the situation of Palestine refugees in Lebanon, including non-registered Palestinian refugees, undocumented (“non-ID”) Palestinians, and Palestine refugees from Syria. It covers the human rights and humanitarian situation of these refugees, as well as their limited access to basic services and livelihoods. It is based on information provided by UNRWA and other available sources up to 23 February 2016.

Health System Resilience: Lebanon and the Syrian refugee crisis

Between 2011 and 2013, the Lebanese population increased by 30% due to the influx of Syrian refugees. While a sudden increase of such magnitude represents a shock to the health system, threatening the continuity of service delivery and destabilizing governance, it also offers a unique opportunity to study resilience of a health system amidst ongoing crisis.
 

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