Human Rights & Protection

Survey of refugees and humanitarian staff in Lebanon

This report is based on answers to two surveys carried out in Lebanon in 2018 as part of a project to understand how refugees and humanitarian staff perceive the impact of the reforms enshrined in the Grand Bargain. The first survey was conducted face-to-face with 895 Syrian and Palestinian refugees across all eight governorates of Lebanon. The second included 290 staff members of national and international aid agencies, with data collected using an online survey tool.

The Legal Status of Syrian Refugees in Lebanon

In October 2014, Lebanon’s Council of Ministers adopted a comprehensive policy on Syrian displacement, one explicit goal of which is to decrease the number of Syrians in Lebanon by reducing access to territory and encouraging return to Syria. This ambition is currently being implemented through the December 2014 General Security Office (GSO) new set of entry requirements for Syrians and new rules for Syrian nationals already in Lebanon applying for and renewing their residency permits.

Trapped in Lebanon: The Alarming Human Rights and Human Security Situation of Syrian Refugees in Lebanon

This report analyses the human rights and human security situation of refugees from Syria and their impact on the Lebanese society. Since the beginning of the conflict
in Syria, Lebanon has received ever-increasing numbers of Syrian citizens and Palestinian refugees living in Syria who were seeking refuge. With almost one and a half million refugees out of a population of four million, Lebanon has the highest proportion of refugees world-wide, and one of the highest in absolute numbers. The country has received more refugees from Syria than the entire European Union.

Justice for Stability: Addressing the Impact of Mass Displacement on Lebanon’s Justice System

This policy brief outlines options for strengthening rule of law in Lebanon to improve access to justice for both Lebanese citizens and Syrian refugees. It discusses stopgap measures for the temporary stay of Syrian refugees in the country and highlights opportunities for long-term reform of the justice system. The brief provides recommendations to key actors on actions to reduce the unsustainable pressure on the Lebanese justice system and to ensure protection of the displaced population.

Policy Paper on Reforming the “Sponsorship System” for Migrant Domestic Workers: Towards an Alternative Governance Scheme in Lebanon

In recent years, the “sponsorship system” (kafala) in Lebanon and in other countries in the region has been identified as a core problem leading to the exploitation and abuse of migrant domestic workers. Previous studies published by KAFA (enough) Violence & Exploitation have argued that “sponsorship” is one root cause for migrant domestic workers’ vulnerability to forced labor, physical and sexual abuse, as well as trafficking.
 

Intertwined: A Study of Employers of Migrant Domestic Workers in Lebanon

Over 250,000 migrant women are employed by private households in Lebanon to carry out household tasks such as cleaning, cooking, and caring for children and the elderly. A standard contract for Domestic Workers sets out the basic parameters for the employment relationship, which creates a legal link between the “the worker” and the “employer”. In Lebanon, the employer wields a great degree of power in determining the living and working conditions of a migrant domestic worker (MDW).

Syrian Refugees in Lebanon between Resilience and Vulnerability

The goal of this study is to measure the impact of the legal status policy on refugee vulnerability and to assess the extent of refugee resilience. We have measured refugee perception of security, mobility, access to services, and social integration in Lebanon. Moreover, we have measured the Lebanese host community’s perception of security and level of tolerance towards refugees in economic and social spheres.

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