Policy Interventions

Lebanon Crisis Response Plan 2017-2020

For the last six years, Lebanon has been at the forefront of one of the worst humanitarian crises of our time. Despite increasing economic, social, demographic, political, and security challenges, Lebanon has shown exceptional commitment and solidarity and has welcomed around 1.5 million refugees fleeing war-torn Syria. Lebanese communities have opened their schools, their clinics and even their homes to hundreds of thousands of Syrians who have fled their country and in many cases lost everything.
 

Responding to the Syrian crisis in Lebanon: Collaboration between Aid Agencies and Local Governance Structures

This working paper seeks to document and analyse collaboration mechanisms between local authorities and humanitarian actors in addressing the Syrian refugee crisis in urban and peri-urban settings in Lebanon. It outlines existing mechanisms of collaboration, analyses their potential strengths and weaknesses, and derives lessons and recommendations for improving refugee responses in Lebanon, and potentially in other national settings.

Local Politics and the Syrian Refugee Crisis: Exploring Responses in Turkey, Lebanon, and Jordan

Refugee protection is inherently political. While international law and values inevitably influence governments’ decisions about how to respond to refugees, so too do power and interests. Host and donor states’ commitment to assist, protect and provide solutions for refugees are all shaped by whether and to what extent they perceive refugees to be a burden or a benefit in relation to security and development outcomes, for example.

"A Shoulder to Lean On.” Towards Rights-Based Interventions and Policies for Syrian Refugees in Lebanon.

This policy brief analyses the socio-political implications of the so-called October policies, and suggests legislative, political, and practical measures to improve the situation of Syrian refugees in Lebanon. It also aims to inform policy formulation regarding Syrian refugees from a human rights-based perspective, while discussing modalities for enhanced programming at the civil society level.

Local Governance Under Pressure

Since the onset of the crisis in Syria in 2011, Lebanon has faced numerous spill over effects. The historically fragile Lebanese structure and economy are struggling to accommodate approximately over 1.1 million registered Syrian refugees and 43,377 Palestinian refugees from Syria. In a country of just over 4 million people and 321,362 Palestinian refugees from Lebanon, population has grown by 30 percent and 1 out of 5 are refugees. The magnitude of the crisis has had a dilapidating effect on the local economy and infrastructure.

Engaging Municipalities in the Response to the Syria Refugee Crisis in Lebanon

The population shift from Syria, as a result of the Syrian Crisis, is causing enormous pressure on host communities and exacerbating instability factors. In an in-depth assessments in 12 vulnerable municipalities in Lebanon, Mercy Corps found that 71% of the surveyed host community indicated that conditions have worsened in their municipalities. As such, with socio-economic conditions in the country continue to decline and political instability rises, it is projected that there will be an increased risk of intolerance and withdrawal of host community assistance to refugees.

Stabilization & Resilience In Protracted, Politically-Induced Emergencies: A Case Study Exploration of Lebanon

The concept of resilience offers a framework that facilitates cross-institutional and cross-disciplinary dialogue and pushes us to examine systems that influence complex situations. To date, resilience thinking has not been extensively applied to politically-induced emergency situations. UN Development Programme (UNDP) and Mercy Corps conducted research to explore this possibility using Lebanon as a case study. This paper examines the following questions: What does resilience mean in the context of the Syrian crisis in Lebanon?

Women's Rights and Gender Equality for Sustainable Development: Discussing the Proposed SDGs within the Context of the Development Problematique in the Arab Region

This paper was prepared by the Economic and Social Commission for Western Asia (ESCWA) as a background paper contributing to the Arab Sustainable Development Report. It focuses on gender equality as a core element to achieve sustainable development. It tackles gender mainstreaming as a strategy to overcome gender inequalities. In addition, this paper discusses proposed sustainable development goals (SDGs) that tackle the gender dimension within the context of the development problematique in Arab countries.

Preventing and responding to gender-based violence in middle and low-income countries: a multi-sectoral literature review and analysis

This paper reviews what is known about more and less effective—or at least promising—approaches to prevent and respond to gender-based violence. Within sectors of justice, health, education, and multi- sectoral approaches, the paper examines initiatives that have addressed laws and policies, institutional reforms, community mobilization, and individual behavior change strategies. The review also highlights cross-cutting lessons that have emerged from research and programs over the last 30 years. 

Has Gender Mainstreaming Failed? A Comment on International Development Agency Experiences in the South

This article addresses the public policy concept of gender mainstreaming and the extent of its efficacy since the 1995 Beijing Platform for Action (PfA) and the UN's adoption thereof in 1997. In addition, it seeks to contribute the the debate by reviewing the gender mainstreaming experiences of a specific group of institutions, rather than one government or organisation.

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