Gender

Lebanon’s 2018 Election: New measures and the resilience of the Status Quo.

This policy brief explores how—despite widespread citizen frustration—the status quo prevailed. The brief will subject the above paradoxes to greater empirical scrutiny, with particular attention to the performance of new actors. It draws findings from an analysis of election results, participant observation of the campaign period, and focus group interviews conducted before and after the election.

English

Breaking the political glass ceiling: Enhancing women's political participation in Lebanon

This policy brief was developed based on an in-depth report titled Women’s Political Participation: Exclusion and Reproduction of Social Roles. Case Studies from Lebanon;” in addition to discussions and insights gathered during a consultation workshop held on 8 November 2018, and which marked the participation of women who had taken part of the research, as well as activists, representatives of civil society organisations, and academics.

Undefined

Politics, Progress, and Parliament in 2018: Can Lebanese Women Make Headway?

Lebanon may witness a remarkable rise in the number of women serving in Parliament come May 2018 due to initiatives from women’s groups, “civil society” activists, and the substantial number of female candidates – 113 at the start of the election period. However, as this briefing paper shows, Lebanese women continue to face numerous challenges in entering government. The new electoral law passed in June 2017 does not provide women with equal opportunity to be elected, and it is yet to be seen whether it will increase female representation in Parliament.
Undefined

A Practical Guide for Civil Society Organisations in Lebanon towards Gender Mainstreaming (En-Ar)

This Gender Manual is a practical guide for civil society organisations in Lebanon that wish to enhance gender equity in their practices and policies. Far from being exhaustive, this manual contains practical guidelines that can help to both gain a better understanding of gender-sensitive topics, as well as to integrate and implement them in internal processes, action plans, and organisational structures and policies. It is informed by the findings of a series of meetings and consultations with various stakeholders engaged in gender issues.
Undefined

On Mixed Identities, Racism, and Activism in Lebanon; A Discussion with Nisreen Kaj.

In a recent article published in the New Yorker, which was quite popular online, mixed marriages between citizens of two different countries are described as playing a part in developing compassion and understanding between people in the world: “The awareness and negotiation of small differences add up to a larger understanding about the complexities of the world.”[1] Amidst growing globalisation, mixed marriages are indeed increasingly common and appreciated for their transnational multiculturalism.

مسار امرأة فلسطينية في بناء هويتها: من الألم إلى الفعل

 تهدف هذه الورقة البحثية إلى تسليط الضوء على عوامل مختلفة تطبع القصة العائلية والمسار الإجتماعي لإمرأة فلسطينية تعيش في مخيم للاجئين في لبنان. وتجدر الإشارة في هذا السياق إلى أن مكوِّنَيْن من الهوية يضطلعان بدور اساسي في بلورة مسألتنا، وهما الهوية الجندرية، والهوية الوطنية. فواقع أن نور تجمع بين كونها امرأة وفلسطينية يجعلها تواجه أشكالا عديدة من العنف، وذلك بسبب الديناميات و/أو حالات التوتر القائمة بين الرجال والنساء من جهة، والفلسطينيين واللبنانيين من جهة أخرى.

التجول في حقل ألغام السلطة - تنظيم نقابة عاملات المنازل في لبنان

"في كل لقاءٍ أجريناه مع مختلف الجاليات، أردت التأكد من أننا نشدّد على فكرة التضامن. لم نعد الآن نقول: الفيليبين وسريلانكا وأثيوبيا وبنغلادش. أصبحنا نقول نقابيات. نحن النساء العاملات. نحن لا نذكر الجاليات، بل نبرز النساء العاملات معاً. هكذا توصلنا إلى [...] نقابة. أنا أنتزع دائماً بطاقتي النقابية وأرفعها بيدي وأسأل: من لديه هذه؟ رداً على ذلك، تلوّح العضوات ببطاقاتهن. فأقول: لقد أصبحت لديكن هذه البطاقة الآن، وفي حال نظرت إحداهن إليكنّ هنا بطرقٍ مغايرة، عليكنّ القول: هيه! أنا واحدة منكن! هذا ما أبرزه دائماً.

« Hors du Hezb, point de salut ». Militer au féminin au sein du Hezbollah libanais.

Chaque jeudi, après la prière du soir, des femmes seules ou en petits groupes défilent dans les rues de Ghobeyri, municipalité de la banlieue sud de Beyrouth (Dahiyeh). Elles se dirigent vers le cimetière Rawdât al-shahîdayn[1] (le jardin de deux martyrs) pour se recueillir sur les tombeaux de leurs proches.

Pages

Subscribe to Gender