Migration, Mobility and Circulation

Lebanese Communities Hosting Syrian Refugees

REACH undertook an assessment of host community needs in Akkar Governorate, one of Lebanon’s most underdeveloped regions. With approximately one-third of the population of Akkar consisting of refugees, there has been a need to understand the pressures caused by large concentrations of displaced persons in one of Lebanon’s poorest regions. The following paper aims to provide information on the challenges this community faces and potential interventions that might support them. Results indicate that livelihoods in Akkar have been affected greatly.

Social Cohesion and Intergroup Relations: Syrian Refugees and Lebanese Nationals in the Bekaa and Akkar

This report focuses on Save the Children’s Casual Labour Initiative (CLI) and its impact on intercommunity social cohesion. It aims to 1) evaluate the CLI project design and implementation, assess its impact on intercommunity perceptions and 2) assess social cohesion in Akkar and the Bekaa, in the locations that benefited from the CLI. It examines an array of socio-political indicators of emerging conflict, including; threat perceptions, contact quantity and quality, readiness for violence) and identified locations of potential concern (mapping).

Better Together: The Impact Of The Schooling System Of Lebanese And Syrian Displaced Pupils On Social Stability

This paper presents the findings from a case study research comparing the impact on social cohesion of segregated and mixed schooling systems of Lebanese and Syrian refugee students. Based on qualitative research with students, their families and teachers, the paper argues that perceptions and relationships between students in mixed classes improve over time. Though this change bears little impact on relationships beyond the school or the attitudes and relationships of family and community members, it does equip students with the ability to counter prevailing prejudice.

Formal Informality, Brokering Mechanisms, and Illegality. The Impact of the Lebanese State’s Policies on Syrian Refugees’ Daily Lives.

This report seeks to provide an overview of Lebanon’s current policy towards Syrian refugees, and to explore the new rules and regulations issued by General Security regarding the entry, residency, and departure of Syrian nationals. It also analyses the challenges pertaining to the current policy and its impact on the daily lives of Syrian refugees, with a special focus on their emerging illegality, their struggle for decent livelihood and working conditions, and increased informality and insecurity.

Crisis & Control, (In)Formal Hybrid Security in Lebanon

This report aims to analyse how formal and informal security providers implement their respective social order agendas through a security “assemblage”. It also aims to inform the debate on refugee protection and security provision in urban settings, in the context of Lebanon’s hybrid security system. The accounts collected illustrate how state security institutions tacitly accept – or even rely on – informal security actors, managing at times to achieve their political and strategic goals through decentralised and/or illegal forms of control.

Cooperating out of isolation: the case of migrant domestic workers in Kuwait, Lebanon and Jordan

This paper is inspired by examples of domestic workers organizing themselves in different parts of the world through social and solidarity economy enterprises and organizations which have become more evident since the advent of the ILO Domestic Workers Convention 2011, (No.189). It analyses current legislative and policy frameworks, institutional structures and membership-based initiatives that could allow and promote domestic workers’ social and solidarity economy enterprises and organizations in three countries in the Middle East; Jordan, Kuwait and Lebanon.

For a fee: The business of recruiting Bangladeshi women for domestic work in Jordan and Lebanon

This study aims to shed light on the industry that profits from the recruitment of women from South Asian countries into domestic work employment in the Middle East, with a particular focus on Bangladesh, Jordan and Lebanon. It analyses the ‘business model’ utilised by labour recruiters to generate income and profit and to minimize risk and loss. In the case of international recruitment, in order to profit, recruiters must devise competitive strategies to generate income greater than the costs of finding, selecting, processing and mobilising people into jobs.

International Migration Paper 48: Women Migrant Domestic Workers in Lebanon

This study, prepared by Dr. Ray Jureidini, identifies practices and patterns that are the key causes for women domestic migrant workers' vulnerability in Bahrain and provide alternative approaches for effective means for action. The research compiled base line data and had the aim of bringing policy makers and all other concerned actors into dialogue in finding solutions through practical means to improve protection and enhance working conditions for women migrant domestic workers. This study identifies and assesses legal and administrative arrangements in hiring domestic workers.

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