Refugees

Local Politics and the Syrian Refugee Crisis: Exploring Responses in Turkey, Lebanon, and Jordan

Refugee protection is inherently political. While international law and values inevitably influence governments’ decisions about how to respond to refugees, so too do power and interests. Host and donor states’ commitment to assist, protect and provide solutions for refugees are all shaped by whether and to what extent they perceive refugees to be a burden or a benefit in relation to security and development outcomes, for example.

Health Status and Health Needs of Older Refugees from Syria in Lebanon

This study sought to characterize the physical and emotional conditions, dietary habits, coping practices, and living conditions of this elderly population arriving in Lebanon between March 2011 and March 2013. A systematic selection of 210 older refugees from Syria was drawn from a listing of 1800 refugees over age 60 receiving assistance from the Caritas Lebanon Migrant Center (CLMC) or the Palestinian Women’s Humanitarian Organization (PALWHO).

The Refugee Crisis in Lebanon and Jordan: The Need for Economic Development Spending

The entry of Syrian refugees into Lebanon and Jordan has resulted in unprecedented social and economic challenges to both countries. These are felt on a day-to-day basis by all Lebanese and Jordanian citizens whether through higher rents and declining public service availability, or through health and education infrastructure that is stretched beyond its limits. There is no doubt that both host countries have been incredibly generous to refugees, particularly at the societal level.

Syrian Refugees in Lebanon between Resilience and Vulnerability

The goal of this study is to measure the impact of the legal status policy on refugee vulnerability and to assess the extent of refugee resilience. We have measured refugee perception of security, mobility, access to services, and social integration in Lebanon. Moreover, we have measured the Lebanese host community’s perception of security and level of tolerance towards refugees in economic and social spheres.

Precarity in Exile: The Legal Status of Syrian Refugees in Lebanon

Lebanon has had an ambiguous approach to the more than one million Syrians seeking protection in the country since 2011. The country is neither party to the 1951 Convention relating to the Status of Refugees, nor does it have any national legislation dealing with refugees. In October 2014, Lebanon’s Council of Ministers adopted the first comprehensive policy on Syrian displacement, one explicit goal of which is to decrease the number of Syrians in Lebanon by reducing access to territory and encouraging return to Syria.

Reconfiguring Relief Mechanisms: The Syrian Refugee Crisis in Lebanon

This paper highlights the specificity of the refugee crisis in the unstable Lebanese landscape and calls for the reconfiguring of current relief mechanisms by enabling decentralized local authorities to lead the process. Crisis Management Teams (CMTs), part of Mohafazat councils, will be responsible of collaborating with national and international agencies, planning and monitoring relief projects.

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