Relief Services

Reconfiguring Relief Mechanisms: The Syrian Refugee Crisis in Lebanon

This paper highlights the specificity of the refugee crisis in the unstable Lebanese landscape and calls for the reconfiguring of current relief mechanisms by enabling decentralized local authorities to lead the process. Crisis Management Teams (CMTs), part of Mohafazat councils, will be responsible of collaborating with national and international agencies, planning and monitoring relief projects.

Politics of Care and Social Responses in the July 2006 War: a Special Focus on Local Faith-Based Organisations*

Politics of Care and Social Responses in the July 2006 War: a Special Focus on Local Faith-Based Organisations

Introduction

The present paper will examine the politics of care of international and local humanitarian actors, as well as the social responses to their intervention in the southern suburbs of Beirut (Dahiye) during the Israeli shelling in the summer of 2006.

Volunteerism as a key to improved resilience and a strengthened local response to crises within Lebanon.

Introduction[1]

For many analysts, the situation in Lebanon appears to be at a tipping point of violence, as the country has welcomed more than 1.5 million Syrian refugees since the start of the conflict in Syria. The consequences that this has brought to Lebanese society have been social, economic and structural, among others.

The Syrian crisis and its impact on Lebanon – A conflict analysis

The present report analyses the impact of the Syrian conflict and refugee crisis on Lebanon and Lebanese host communities. This brief analysis presents the main conflict issues and trends, and the network of interaction between local and national level conflict dynamics. It provides an overview of key actors relevant to addressing intercommunal conflict and draws some programming implications, for both conflict sensitivity of current programming and further opportunities for conflict transformation.

Report of the Secretary-General for the World Humanitarian Summit

The United Nations Secretary-General has called for the first ever World Humanitarian Summit: to reaffirm our commitment to humanity and chart a course for change. The Secretary-General’s Agenda for Humanity calls on global leaders to commit to five core responsibilities in the name of our shared humanity: 1. Global leadership to prevent and end conflict 2. Uphold the norms that safeguard humanity 3. Leave no one behind 4. Change people's lives – from delivering aid to ending need 5. Invest in humanity

Relief as a neutral form of aid or a political-communal mobilization? Doing politics in emergencies and war and the politics of aid in Lebanon

This case study explores the issues of neutrality and local commitment in providing assistance during war and conflict. It aims at placing the humanitarian principle of neutrality, a global principle of humanitarian assistance that posits a specific form and stance in providing aid, in conversation with local forms of political and communal mobilization of relief, by taking as an example the July war in 2006, and its aftermath.

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