Lebanon

Social Cohesion and Governance Programming in Lebanon – Testing Theories of Change and Impact Evaluation

With the Syrian crisis in its fourth year, tensions between Lebanese host communities and refugees are high. After years of strain on employment, social services and resources, and the continued deterioration of the national economic situation due to falling trade and foreign investment, Lebanon and the Lebanese face unprecedented challenges managing the effects of the crisis. Furthermore, the economic hardships also erode the relationship between the Government of Lebanon and its constituents, as all confidence in the government’s ability to provide services collapses.

Resilience in the Face of Crisis: Rooting Resilience in the Realities of the Lebanese Experience

Since 2011, Lebanon has seen a huge influx of refugees fleeing the violence in Syria and currently hosts the biggest number of Syrian refugees in the world. Faced with waves of violence, insecurity and instability, Lebanese communities have found ways of adapting and developed coping mechanisms to deal with worsening conditions. This adaptability has often been called ‘resilience’.

Lebanese Communities Hosting Syrian Refugees

REACH undertook an assessment of host community needs in Akkar Governorate, one of Lebanon’s most underdeveloped regions. With approximately one-third of the population of Akkar consisting of refugees, there has been a need to understand the pressures caused by large concentrations of displaced persons in one of Lebanon’s poorest regions. The following paper aims to provide information on the challenges this community faces and potential interventions that might support them. Results indicate that livelihoods in Akkar have been affected greatly.

Lebanon: Looking Ahead in Times of Crisis: Taking Stock of the Present to Urgently Build Sustainable Options for the Future

Considerable analysis has been undertaken to date on the challenges and impacts on and of Syrian refugees in Lebanon – including by Oxfam – but the bulk of this analysis is seen through the lens of the wider Syria crisis and often fails to take into consideration Lebanon itself as a country in crisis or use a wider inequality and poverty lens.

Social Cohesion and Intergroup Relations: Syrian Refugees and Lebanese Nationals in the Bekaa and Akkar

This report focuses on Save the Children’s Casual Labour Initiative (CLI) and its impact on intercommunity social cohesion. It aims to 1) evaluate the CLI project design and implementation, assess its impact on intercommunity perceptions and 2) assess social cohesion in Akkar and the Bekaa, in the locations that benefited from the CLI. It examines an array of socio-political indicators of emerging conflict, including; threat perceptions, contact quantity and quality, readiness for violence) and identified locations of potential concern (mapping).

The Social Stability Context in the Nabatieh & Bint Jbeil Qazas

This report presents a brief analysis of the social stability context in the Qazas of Nabatieh and Bint Jbeil in the Nabatieh governorate, a sparsely populated religiously and politically homogenous area which hosts a small number of Syrian refugees. The highly securitized border area is economically dependent on migrants’ remittances and agriculture, with a few small industries. The area is largely dominated by the strong presence and popularity of a limited number of actors, namely Hezbollah and the Amal movement and the security apparatuses, with a few secular and nationalistic parties.

Stabilization & Resilience In Protracted, Politically-Induced Emergencies: A Case Study Exploration of Lebanon

The concept of resilience offers a framework that facilitates cross-institutional and cross-disciplinary dialogue and pushes us to examine systems that influence complex situations. To date, resilience thinking has not been extensively applied to politically-induced emergency situations. UN Development Programme (UNDP) and Mercy Corps conducted research to explore this possibility using Lebanon as a case study. This paper examines the following questions: What does resilience mean in the context of the Syrian crisis in Lebanon?

Politics of Care and Social Responses in the July 2006 War: a Special Focus on Local Faith-Based Organisations*

Politics of Care and Social Responses in the July 2006 War: a Special Focus on Local Faith-Based Organisations

Introduction

The present paper will examine the politics of care of international and local humanitarian actors, as well as the social responses to their intervention in the southern suburbs of Beirut (Dahiye) during the Israeli shelling in the summer of 2006.

Security That Protects: Informing Policy on Local Security Provision in Lebanese Communities Hosting Syrian Refugees

The purpose of this policy brief is to inform policy formulation on local level security provision and refugee protection, and to propose modalities for upgrading the sys- tems of the Lebanese security institutions in a way that strengthens protection of the Lebanese communities and the Syrian refugees they host.

Crisis & Control, (In)Formal Hybrid Security in Lebanon

This report aims to analyse how formal and informal security providers implement their respective social order agendas through a security “assemblage”. It also aims to inform the debate on refugee protection and security provision in urban settings, in the context of Lebanon’s hybrid security system. The accounts collected illustrate how state security institutions tacitly accept – or even rely on – informal security actors, managing at times to achieve their political and strategic goals through decentralised and/or illegal forms of control.

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