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Tatimma Issue 3

Conflicts, abuses, repression, and human rights violations always leave a bitter taste when proper mourning to achieve personal or communal healing is cutoff by indifference, and politics of amnesia.

International law clearly recognises the right of victims and survivors to know about the circumstances of serious violations of their human rights and about who was responsible for their suffering.

Tatimma Issue 2

The Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) are a set of eight specific objectives for enhancing the human condition, including goals of poverty reduction and improvement in education, gender equality, health, and environmental quality among others. Each goal is associated with specific targets – eighteen in total – and each target is related to quanti able indicators – forty-eight in total.

Tatimma Issue 1

This issue of Tatimma focuses on the question of civil rights and liberties in Lebanon. Whilst it is usually considered that civil freedoms in Lebanon are light-years ahead of other Arab countries. Yet this state of liberties appears to be more a facade for a discriminatory system which limits the liberties of Lebanese citizens, specifically Lebanese women, refugees, foreign workers to name a few.

Civil Society Review issue 2 - Lebanese, refugee, and migrant women in Lebanon: From sociopolitical marginality to turnaround strategies (preview)

While women’s issues and rights have been at the forefront of public and civil society debate, academic, and activist publications, women’s inequalities and the discrimination women face in Lebanon have been notably undermined, whether as citizens, refugees, or migrants. However, if the publicising of the “issue of women in Lebanon” has prompted the production of more “gender-related” information and knowledge, it has oftentimes adopted the rhetoric of denunciation and victimisation.

Civil Society Review issue 1 - Revisiting Inequalities in Lebanon: the case of the "Syrian refugee crisis" and gender dynamics

The objective of the Civil Society Review is to bring civil society practitioners, experts, activists, and researchers together to develop knowledge, as well as to innovate new tools and practices so as to strengthen Lebanon’s civil society and its voice. The Civil Society Review produces evidence-based research and analysis and disseminates findings and recommendations to promote civic engagement, shape policies, and stimulate debate within civil society spheres in Lebanon.

اللاجئون والأشخاص النازحون داخليا بين حقوق الانسان والواقع

هذا هو العدد 21 من "موارد"، المجلة المتخصصة بالتربية على حقوق الانسان، التي يصدرها المكتب الإقليمي للشرق الأوسط و شمال أفريقيا بمنظمة العفو الدولية في بيروت. نخصص هذا العدد لموضوع اللاجئين والأشخاص النازحين داخليا، ويوفر العدد في هذا السياق مجموعة واسعة من الموارد.

63% Favor A Temporary Military Takeover and A Referendum on Lebanon's Identity

The Lebanese people are divided behind their zu'ama (leaders), who always disagree over national and critical matters in order to protect their status and interests. Recently, some politicians called for the need to hold a referendum on the presidential elections and other issues as a means to resolve the current political deadlock.

Numbers for The Lebanese Memory

Parliamentary elections of 2009 and the year 2008 in review. The evenings of tuesday and Wednesday, April 7/8 marked the last day to register as a candidate for the Lebanese Parliamentary Elections scheduled on Sunday June 7, 2009. The first candidate to register was Ali Badri Dandash (Shia'a seats allocated to Baalbak and Hermel district) and the last candidate was Mazhar Muhamad Osman (Sunniseats allocated to Minieh and Daniya district). The total number of candidates is 702.

14% of Lebanese Read Books 41% of Lebanese Ready To Use Arms

Events and experiences over the past years have confirmed that Lebanon is not a "country" in the legal and political context of the term but an "agreement" between 18 confessions to live on one land and find an appropriate framework (the state) to deal with their differences. If they respect this agreement, peace and prosperity are established; but if they fail to comply with it, wars and crises erupt. Understanding Lebanon's different confessions is a necessity to get to know the country's reality with its wars, conflicts and accords.

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