Migration, Mobility and Circulation

Cooperating out of isolation: the case of migrant domestic workers in Kuwait, Lebanon and Jordan

This paper is inspired by examples of domestic workers organizing themselves in different parts of the world through social and solidarity economy enterprises and organizations which have become more evident since the advent of the ILO Domestic Workers Convention 2011, (No.189). It analyses current legislative and policy frameworks, institutional structures and membership-based initiatives that could allow and promote domestic workers’ social and solidarity economy enterprises and organizations in three countries in the Middle East; Jordan, Kuwait and Lebanon.

For a fee: The business of recruiting Bangladeshi women for domestic work in Jordan and Lebanon

This study aims to shed light on the industry that profits from the recruitment of women from South Asian countries into domestic work employment in the Middle East, with a particular focus on Bangladesh, Jordan and Lebanon. It analyses the ‘business model’ utilised by labour recruiters to generate income and profit and to minimize risk and loss. In the case of international recruitment, in order to profit, recruiters must devise competitive strategies to generate income greater than the costs of finding, selecting, processing and mobilising people into jobs.

International Migration Paper 48: Women Migrant Domestic Workers in Lebanon

This study, prepared by Dr. Ray Jureidini, identifies practices and patterns that are the key causes for women domestic migrant workers' vulnerability in Bahrain and provide alternative approaches for effective means for action. The research compiled base line data and had the aim of bringing policy makers and all other concerned actors into dialogue in finding solutions through practical means to improve protection and enhance working conditions for women migrant domestic workers. This study identifies and assesses legal and administrative arrangements in hiring domestic workers.

Caring is Work: Meeting Social Care Needs in Lebanon

The evolution of economic incentives and social norms in Lebanon has created new challenges for women to balance work and family life. Underlying dynamics include changes in the demographic structure, the family structure, and the political and economic situation in the country. This paper investigates the perceptions and practices of paid and unpaid care provision. It examines the gender division of labour in the household in interface with women’s labour force participation, and the role of women migrant domestic workers in providing care given the deficit in social care provision.

Inside Syria: What Local Actors Are Doing For Peace

Local actors experience conflicts first hand. Therefore, they have an intimate understanding of what conflict dynamics need to be addressed in order to build sustainable peace. This also holds true for the Syrian case where a number of actors inside the country are engaged in significant peacebuilding activities despite the persistence of extreme levels of violence. This study seeks to increase the understanding about these local actors, their perceptions of conflict causes, drivers of conflict, and its consequences, as well as their local peacebuilding activities.

Actors and raids in conflicts of social discrimination

This visual looks into the actors and raids in incidents mapped and classified as social discrimination on our conflict mapping. Since our classifications includes social discrimination and social solidarity acts, the actors visualisation shows who is behind each behind social discrimination and social solidarity acts, and reflects the actions of small grassroots collectives, such as "Committee for The Fight Against Sectarianism and Racism", in mobilising against social discrimination.

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